Maryborough Rotary
 
Upcoming Program
Feb 11, 2016
Disaster Aid Australia,
plus Rotarians Judy Dennis and Lindsay Florence about the Swap meet
Feb 14, 2016
Reverse Triathlon
Help needed
Feb 25, 2016
Committee Meetings
Meeting starts at 6 then meal at 7pm
Mar 03, 2016
#SayNO2familyviolence Report
Garry Higgins and Co
Mar 11, 2016
Joint meeting with Melbourne Rotary Club
Lunch at Rodborough Bucknall Trust - picnic lunch
Mar 17, 2016
Sharon Fraser
Go Goldfields update
Mar 24, 2016
Mar 31, 2016
Committee Meetings
Start at 6pm with meetings the dinner @ 7pm
 
Upcoming Events at Maryborough Rotary
  • RYPEN CAMP
    Adekate Campsite, Creswick
    Apr 08, 2016 6:00 PM –
    Apr 10, 2016 2:00 PM
 
February 2016
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Club Executives & Directors
President
President Elect
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Community Service
Vocation
International Service
Foundation Director
Membership Director
IPP / Grievance Officer
Youth Service
 

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You are always welcome at Maryborough Rotary

Maryborough

Service Above Self

We meet Thursdays at 6:30 PM
Dining Hall,
Raglan House, Raglan St.
Maryborough, Victoria  3465
Australia
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What's Happening at Maryborough Rotary?
 
Week 33: February 11, 2016
 
Greetings Rotarians,
You were all in fine voice as we sang Imagine and raised a glass to toast World Peace. Thank you Meryl and Geoff for the music.
Our Guest Speaker, Susanna Dowie gave us an insight into “What I learnt About Being an Author”. Susanna has finished her first book, Longshaw Drift, about a real incident in 13th century, which she hopes will be published soon and is currently onto her second book.
On Monday several Rotarians attended the Group 7 meeting with Beaufort Rotary. Many great projects are happening in the name of Rotary in our area. Stawell has just completed a Schoolies visit to Cambodia. Beaufort continue their connection with Mont Albert and Surrey Hills (MASH) Rotary Club, combining in both country and city to help each other. Ararat has finally finished their coffee van and are very pleased with it. All clubs gave scholarships to students at local schools.
On Wednesday, Terry and I visited Mount Gambier Rotary. They have 30 members, who run a market EVERY week! Committee meetings were held and I am pleased to say Maryborough’s committee meetings were better attended (at last). They are having an International dinner on February 24th, with local migrants involved. They are also planning another event with more of their migrant population.
Thank you again to Tom, for refurbishing our flags. They do look very good and cared for now.
REVERSE TRIATHLON is on Sunday week, 14th. We will take names next week or contact Kate please.  It is usually very pleasant, although can be a bit cold at the start. Bring a chair, book and jacket. Be at the outdoor pool at 6.30 – 6.45am. That allows time to get hi-vis vest, cap, radio and be at the required intersection for 7.30am start.
A quote about Peace in our World
"Peace is not won by those who fiercely guard their differences, but by those who, with open minds and hearts, seek out connections." - Katherine Paterson.
 
Keep Safe
Thea
 
 

 
​Remember this time last year and all the planning the club members/ partners and friends were doing to make sure it ran "just right"?
 
​Also remember the fun with trying to figure out the numbers, and the amount of people that came per club?
 
​Now its DG Jane's turn to do the worrying, but we can ease that some. All you have to do is register for this year's conference in Geelong. Remember all that fun we had, we can have it again this year. New members, I would absolutely encourage to go. Learn about Rotary, be inspired to "Be a Gift to the World". When one attends Conference, the rewards are immense for both the club and for you personally. Meet and make new friends as well as catching up with old friends who we rarely see due to the commitments that everyone ha​s. ​This is the link to register - join in the fun HERE
 

 
On 2 December, a terrorist attack killed 14 people and wounded more than 20 others in San Bernardino, California.
 
Less than two months later, an event nearby focused on peace: the Rotary World Peace Conference. The two-day meeting on 15-16 January brought together experts from around the world to explore ideas and solutions to violence and conflict.
 
The conference was the first of five Rotary presidential conferences planned for this year.
San Bernardino County official Janice Rutherford, a member of the Rotary Club of Fontana, California, told attendees at the opening general session that the conference couldn’t be timelier.
“Now more than ever, we need to come together and create peace and reduce human suffering,” said Rutherford, who declared 15 January 2016 Rotary World Peace Day and a Day of Peace for San Bernardino County. “We appreciate your commitment to exploring these options and taking them back to your community and the rest of the world.”
 
More than 150 leaders in the fields of peace, education, business, law, and health care led over 100 breakout sessions and workshops. Topics ranged from how to achieve peace through education to combating human trafficking to the role the media has in eliminating conflict.
 
Hosted by Rotary districts in California, and attended by more than 1,500 people, the conference is an example of how Rotary members are taking peace into their own hands, said RI President K.R. Ravindran. “We can’t wait for governments to build peace, or the United Nations. We can’t expect peace to be handed to us on a platter,” said Ravindran. “We have to build peace from the bottom, from the foundation of our society. The valuable information you leave with at the end of this conference will aid you in managing conflict in your personal lives, local communities, and potentially around the world.”
 
Actress and humanitarian Sharon Stone urged conference attendees to find tolerance within themselves as a way to develop compassion and understanding for others. Noting that today’s technology makes it easy to learn about diverse cultures and beliefs, Stone encouraged Rotary members to embrace differences while learning about others’ work. “The more we understand the darkness of our enemies, the better we know what to do, how to respond and behave,” said Stone.
 
Rotary is inching the world closer to meaningful change, said the Rev. Greg Boyle, executive director of Homeboy Industries, a Los Angeles-based gang intervention and reentry program. “Rotary decided to dismantle the barriers that exclude people,” said Boyle, a bestselling author and Catholic priest. “You [Rotary members] know that we must stand outside the margins so that the margins can be erased. You stand with the poor, the powerless, and those whose dignity has been denied.”
 
Rotary’s most formidable weapon against war, violence, and intolerance is its Rotary Peace Centers program. Through study and field work, peace fellows at the centers become catalysts for peace and conflict resolution in their communities and around the globe. Dozens of Rotary peace fellows attended the conference to promote the program, learn about other peace initiatives, and help Rotary clubs understand the role they can play. Peace Fellow Christopher Zambakari, who recently graduated from the University of Queensland in Australia, said the conference is a chance to increase awareness of what others are doing to achieve peace. “Some people have only a local view toward peace,” said Zambakari, whose consulting firm in Phoenix, Arizona, USA, provides advisory services to organizations in Africa and the Middle East. “An event like this, with so many diverse perspectives, can open up connections and different possibilities to how we all can work towards a more peaceful world." 
 
Other speakers included Carrie Hessler-Radelet, director of the U.S. Peace Corps; Judge Daniel Nsereko, special tribunal for Lebanon; Gillian Sorensen, senior adviser at the United Nations Foundation; Steve Killelea, founder and executive chair of the Institute for Economics and Peace; Dan Lungren, former U.S. representative; and Mary Ann Peters, chief executive officer of The Carter Center and former U.S. ambassador to Bangladesh.
 
By Ryan Hyland (Rotary News 1-Feb-2016)
 

 
​Aquabox Australia is having a stand at the District Conference, both for our District 9780 in Geelong with helpers from the Rotary Club of Eltham coming along, but also in Bendigo for the District 9800 conference the weekend before. We are hoping to raise money to be able to pre-locate Aquaboxes ready for the emergencies that we kow will happen. To have them ready to go before the event, rather than scrambling after to try to catch up. Please consider for birthday's, anniversaries, Christmas etc it is a perfect gift when you are not sure what to give the person who has everything.
For the newer members ASK Karen for more information, if you have an idea to raise some funds she will be glad to hear them.
 

 
Where did this tradition start? What is the history of the RI annual theme?

Guernsey

The first RI president to present a “Theme” to Rotarians during the International was S. Kenner Guernsy, RI President in 1947-48. His Theme was:  

“Enter to learn, go forth to serve.”

Rotarians at the International Assembly held in Quebec, 1948. 
Photo © Rotary International.


 
Note the sign over the entry door with the first “RI Theme” stated.
The International Assembly, is Rotary's annual event for governors-elect. It was first held in Chicago in 1919. Between 1928-1950, it was held before the convention, at a site near the convention city. It then moved to Lake Placid, New York, for more than 20 years. In recent years, it has been held in San Diego, California, USA. It's now held much earlier to allow incoming governors more time to prepare for their year as governor.
 
During the 1948-49 year RI president Agus S. Mitchell did not have a Theme. In 1949-50 President Percy Hodgson had more of a listing of Objectives, than a theme. That was followed in 1950-51 by Arthur Lagueux, Quebec, Canada, who listed a set of goals he wished to be followed.Presidents Frank S. Spain, Birmington, Alabama, 1951-52 and H. J. Brunnier, San Francisco, California, 1952-53 had no theme or goals as stated. President Joaquin Serratosa Cibils, Montevideo, Uruguay, 1953-54, presented a Theme “Rotary is Hope in Action”.

The first “Theme” and “Logo” combination was presented by PRI Herbert J. Taylor, the creator of the 4-way test, and RI President 1954-55. PRIP Herbert Taylor had a Theme of six objectives for Rotarians to follow. His Theme logo was a card to each Rotary Club President congratulating them on their election as President of their Club during that “Golden Anniversary Year” (50 years) and suggesting that they study the six goals that he had put forth. From that start, each incoming RI President has created a “Theme” and a “Logo.” That combination is presented to the incoming District Governors each year during the International Assembly.

Themes

Six Objectives for 1954-55:

1. glean from the past and act
2. share with others
3. build with Rotary’s Way Test
4. serving youth
5. international good will
6. good Rotarians are good citizens.

The Theme for the year 2016-17 as presented by Incoming RI president John Germ in San Diego last week is:

 
 

 
RI President Elect John Germ announced his theme for 2016-2017 on Tuesday - the theme is "Rotary Serving Humanity". We should all have no problems in working with that!
 

 

  Many of the Maryborough Rotary members may remember Ravi from his visit to the club

It is not  often that you see a Consul General swim in sewage infused flood waters to help more than a  thousand stranded people! This is what Mr.Ravi Raman did. The Honorary Consul of Mauritius for South India and Managing Director of RR industries owns RR Towers in Guindy Industrial Estate,Chennai, which houses more than 40 IT and other companies including Wipro, Quadrant, Bharat Matrimony etc.  

When rains battered and flooded Chennai, Ravi did not sit around and send financial aid or delegate rescue and relief for people in and around his towers whose lives were threatened. Instead, he took it upon himself to personally go, rescue and supervise all arrangements despite his buildings being under 12 feet of water. There were some 50 employees of his tenants plus his own maintenance staff who were stuck in his buildings RR Tower 3 and 4 and another 1000 from the neighbouring labourer’s colony whose houses were washed away in the floods, who needed immediate help. Ravi risked his life and drove till the point where he could, and parked his car and got into his swimming trunks to swim in the oily, mucky and highly contaminated water for almost a kilometer before he reached his building to assess the situation first hand. Ravi describes the experience “ The water was more than 8 feet deep and the currents were very strong. It took me more than an hour to reach the spot and  it was not easy swimming for so long but I was determined to reach the people whose lives were at risk. On the way, I rested on cars which were submerged in water and swam along. I was shocked to see what lay in front of me; the area resembled a large lake, the entire basement was covered in water and the cars were submerged deep under. The nearby slums and houses of labourers were all under water”.  Ravi has lived all his life in Chennai and says that he had never seen anything of this magnitude ever.

Ravi Raman opened his heart to the thousand plus labourers by allowing them inside his buildings before the waters reached dangerous levels and submerged their houses. For fear of theft, none of the other office complexes allowed these people inside their buildings. Ravi organised food the next day and took care of all the needs of the labourers and the other people who were stuck there for the next 4 days. There were pregnant women who were amongst the people stranded and food had to reach them quickly. Ravi says,“ The first day when I went, we were unable to organise food but we got the food early next day and all the family members accompanied me in the boat to deliver the food packets. We did that for the next 4 days till the rains and the water levels subsided. We then pumped out the water and evacuated the people”. There were thousands of people in the neighbouring slums and food packets were delivered to them too.
 

 
Rotary Australia World Community Service (RAWCS)
 
Traditionally,  RAWCS has been the Australian arm of Rotary International that assists Rotary Clubs with the development and management of International projects. As a result of its recent re-organisation into a National Rotary body, RAWCS now offers more diverse opportunities for service projects here in Australia and overseas
RAWCS is the largest and fastest growing arm of Rotary in Australia.
 
The RAWCS vision is to support Australian Rotarians and Rotary Clubs in assisting disadvantaged communities and individuals with humanitarian aid projects.
RAWCS consists of several committees integrated together within the same organization
 
PROJECT VOLUNTEERS
DONATIONS IN KIND  (DIK)
ROTARIANS AGAINST MALARIA (RAM)
SAFE WATER AND SANITATION SAVES  LIVES (SSWSL)
ROTARY AUSTRALIA BENEVOLENT SOCIETY
ROTARY AUSTRALIA DISASTER FUND
- See more at: http://www.rotary9780.org/Stories/rotary-australia-world-community-service-(rawcs)#sthash.GBOysKgn.dpuf
 

 
Volunteer Organisations Working together to help after the recent Scotsburn fires
 
The devastation caused by the Scotsburn fires  on December 15,   saw the people of Ballarat and district rallying to help those who had been affected by the disaster .
Through the coordination efforts of the Buninyong Lion’s Club the Rotary Clubs of the Ballarat region, we were able to provide support to the volunteer workers by preparing and serving meals .The Rotary Clubs involved worked on a roster system with other organisations such as CFA, CWA and Lion’s.
 
A wonderful effort by all, demonstrating that when disasters happen, volunteer organisations like Rotary are always ready to answer the call for help.  (picture shows volunteers with a number of fridges ready to be used to assist in the task of supporting those who had lost their homes)  You will find detailed reports on the left hand side of this page under Scotsburn Fires 2016.
 
- See more at: http://www.rotary9780.org/Stories/volunteer-organisations-working-together-to-help-after-the-recent-scotsburn-fires#sthash.nFl9x135.dpuf
 

 
 
 
 
Family Violence Program: Click on the Logo
 
Rotary On The Move Newsletter
 
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Pyrenees Magic Bike Ride
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